Certificate in Race, Culture & Anti-Discrimination: Core Competence

Next Certificate in RACE, Culture, & Anti-Discrimination Training: Book here 

Introduction

Next Certificate in RACE, Culture, & Anti-Discrimination Training: Book here 

This race, culture and anti-discriminatory practice core competence training is for ALL trainees and qualified counsellors and psychotherapists, psychologists, psychiatrists and the helping profession. It is based on racial and cultural development theory, client experiences, research and experiential learning, as well as a specific training approach. It is also suitable for personal self-development.

It shall be delivered under the identifying name “The Anti-Discrimination Focus (#TADF) by approved #TADF therapists listed on the website: tadf.co.uk.

The training is self-certified as being compliant and therefore including abilities, skills and knowledge according to the following standards:

Training consists of six parts (32 hours training) and follows an anti-discriminatory growth model of racial-cultural development which will be presented during training. The focus is on experiential learning, race and culture dialogue, and interactive reflection.

You may elect the parts you wish to participate in any order.

Race and culture training curriculum: This is a monthly 30-minute introductory session to the training programme, explaining how it evolved, its theoretical tenets, methodology, curriculum, assessment and content. This is not part of the main training and does not need to be taken by participants.

Part 1: The challenge of seeing the racial and/or cultural other in therapy

“If you can’t see me through my race and culture then you don’t see me. And if you don’t see me then you don’t see how I see you.” ~ Unknown

This session will orient you to the core tenets and journey of becoming an race and culture-aware therapist, and ask both individually and collectively: what will you need to do to “see” clients who are racially and/or culturally diverse to you in your therapeutic practice?

We will explore the contextual themes which shape racio-cultural “otherness” such as power relations, systemic and indirect discrimination, injustice (social and political), the possible meaning(s) of racial dialogue, racio-cultural identity crisis, and lived-in experiences for client groups whose house is structured differently to your own with its own epistemological frame of reference.

We hope to kickstart your reflective process so you can make the leap towards equality of service regardless of racio-cultural diversity.

Part 2: Situating your racial and cultural identity

Everyone holds race and culture.

In this workshop I will help you to explore your individual and group(s) racial and cultural identity, and your relationship with it. What ancestral and collective events, trauma, and culture shaped your personal identity? And on the other side what is the meaning of your groups race and culture? How do you see yourself and how do others see you? And do you continue to have identity and belonging conflicts because of it?

This will help compare and contrast your individual racio-cultural identity development as the training progresses and importantly to recognise race and culture as a universal aspect of the self. We will also integrate these ideas by exploring its links to psychosocial, whiteness, acculuration and racio-cultural identity development theories.

Part 3: Working with race and culture in the room

“Our fathers and mothers came to these shores in hope for a better life for their family. But they didn’t realise there was something they could never provide. Belonging” ~ m.a.

In this workshop we turn to the work in the room and ask how we can work effectively where clients have a very different worldview and/or have lived experiences of racism and discrimination.

This workshop focuses on the central challenge of establishing and maintaining the therapeutic relationship. We will reflect on case studies from the perspectives of therapists, clients, supervisees and trainees, as well as your own experiences in practice. We will uncover the potentially insidious nature of unconscious racial bias and how it is revealed through everyday verbal and non-verbal language. We will look at racial dialogue, themes of relational process, and working with a range of racial related emotions such as anxiety, rage, shame and guilt.

This is a chance to put into practice all you’ve experienced and learnt and get live experience of working with clients in a role play situation. You will work in a small group of two or three. You will be given scenarios in which to act out “as-if” live sessions, and then you will give and receive feedback. Don’t worry, you won’t be asked to do this role play in front of the whole group unless you wish to. We will all reflect on the scenarios and what worked well or what felt off based on reflecting on the context provided. This type of role play will reinforce all the work you have done up to now.

Part 4: Antidiscrimination / anti-oppressive advocacy in practice

 “Advocacy is the ‘big E’ – empathy for your diverse clients” ~ m.a.

How do you advocate for groups that have faced discrimination on a mass scale? In this workshop we make the case for social advocacy as a way of embodying an antiracist attitude and how work inside and outside the room is an important part of developing trust with your diverse clients. This session explores actions, both micro and macro, which could help end racial discrimination but also help you become more attuned to the realities of everyday racism. We will also consider professional ethics of social advocacy and reflect on developing an individual personal call-to-action plan.

Part 5: Working with Racio-cultural identity and discrimination (4 hours or 2 weekly 2-hour sessions)

This workshop focuses on working with each client’s race process including race and cultural identity, conflicts of identity, cross racial relationships, race-based abuse, trauma, discrimination and healing. Latest ethical best practice, assessment considerations, theory, law and interventions are described and contextualised in supporting clients. Our very own Antiracist racio-cultural development model will be introduced and how it can be used to understand the client-therapist relationship, antiracist self-development, racio-cultural identity development and impact of relational differences due to levels of race awareness.

Throughout these sessions everyone will reflect on their own process, what has been learnt, including bias, and how they wish to continue developing in working with groups that have suffered oppression along race and cultural lines. There will also be an opportunity to reflect on your own racial development and how it has changed since beginning this training programme.

This is a chance to put into practice all you’ve experienced and learnt and get live experience of working with clients in a role play situation. You will work in a small group of two or three. You will be given scenarios in which to act out “as-if” live sessions, and then you will give and receive feedback. Don’t worry, you won’t be asked to do this role play in front of the whole group unless you wish to. We will all reflect on the scenarios and what worked well or what felt off based on reflecting on the context provided. This type of role play will reinforce all the work you have done up to now.

Part 6: Working with Racial Trauma and Racial-Cultural Discrimination

In this section we focus on working with racial trauma, racial-cultural discrimination, client empowerment strategies, and racial-cultural discomfort expressed in the room. We will look at racial dialogue and how to work with a range of emotions such as anxiety, anger, shame and guilt.

Throughout these sessions everyone will reflect on their own process, what has been learnt, including bias, and how they wish to continue developing. There will also be an opportunity to reflect on your own racial development and how it has changed since beginning this training programme. Options for further development are highlighted.

Next Certificate in RACE, Culture, & Anti-Discrimination Training: Book here 

TADF Race and Culture Aware Therapist

On completion of all six parts of this CPD you can Follow up with this training on path to becoming a TADF Certified Therapist which consists of a short group encounter and an assessment (Retakes allowed).

Group Encounter (Five weekly 2.5-hour sessions, plus 1 session contingency)

“I’m not going to trust you. Not until you can let me transform you” ~ m.a.

Group work is a crucial part of therapists’ racial and cultural identity self-development. This is a personal experiential encounter for you to meet the racial self/other and engage in personal dialogue. There is nothing required of you other than bring your “self” personally in sharing and responding to opinions, experiences and feelings about race and how it intersects with other identities such as gender. Everyone will learn through experience and relationships rather than through study. In my experience these encounters are powerful, healing and have potential for enormous shifts in racial awareness.

*Please note we take safety very seriously through the training. Safety strategies will be outlined and discussed prior to the encounter taking place. Access to supervisor and/or therapist is mandatory.

Assessment. After the Group encounter you can take the assessment to become Race and Culture Aware & Assessed Therapist.